category: MATA Festival Event

Blóðhófnir

Saturday, May 11th, 2019

                                                                                                                                                                                                    MATA

Composer Kristín þóra Haraldsdóttir brings poet Ger∂ur Kristný’s words to life in a stunning work of contemporary music for the #MeToo era. Featuring haunting vocal harmonies and period instruments, Bló∂hófnir (Bloodhoof) is a sonic realization of Ger∂ur Kristný’s award-winning poem by the same name. In it, she takes the classic Eddic poem Skírnismál (The “Lay of Skírnir”) and turns it on its head; by retelling the narrative from the perspective of a victimized giantess, rather than the god who kidnaps her, Ger∂ur Kristný redefines a “romantic” tale as one marked by sexual violence, and re-evaluates cultural assumptions in light of contemporary realities. Sung in Icelandic by an all-female cast, including alto Sara Couden in the lead role, with visuals by Tinna Kristjánsdóttir. Presented in partnership with the PEN World Voices Festival.

 

Saturday, May 11

8PM at the University Settlement – Speyer Hall, 184 Eldridge St., NYC
$30 Preferred Seating/ $20 General Admission

The event will be preceded at 7PM by a discussion with composer Kristín þóra Haraldsdóttir and poet Ger∂ur Kristný moderated by Carla Bellamy (City University of New York)

Tickets available here

Kristín þóra Haraldsdóttir (Iceland) Bló∂hófnir (Bloodhoof) (2016-19) World Premiere of Revised Version

The Friends of MATA
Chloe Feder, baroque violin
Dongmyung Ahn, baroque viola
Ana Kim, baroque ‘cello
Dara Bloom, baroque contrabass
Artis Wodehouse, harmonium
Jacqui Kerrod, lever harp

with
Sara Couden, contralto
Augusta Caso, mezzo-soprano
Katherine Tynan, mezzo-soprano

Future Perfect

Saturday, April 13th, 2019

On Saturday April 13, join MATA on an intrepid journey from our present to the post-human future with Future Perfect.  The Friends of MATA are joined by pianist Conrad Tao, performing Remy Siu’s Foxconn Frequency no. 2, a multimedia theater work that questions perfection, pedagogy, and factory culture, and – wrapped in aluminum foil – vocalist Paul Pinto, in works that make the future come alive in all of its sensory overload. The conclusion of MATA’s Festival mainstage events at the Kitchen, Future Perfect visits a world of androids, bots and zombies where yesterday’s science fiction is tomorrow’s reality.

Saturday, April 13

8PM at the The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
$25

Tickets available at The Kitchen

Andrew Watts (USA) What it means to be post human (2017-18) New York Premiere
Remy Siu (Canada) Foxconn Frequency No. 2 (2017) US Premiere
Tatiana Gerasimenok (Belarus/Russia) Bohemian Algae (2017) US Premiere
Constantin Basica (Romania/USA) Fugue for Bells, Beans, and Bugs (2017) New York Premiere
Carolyn Chen (USA) The movement of glass through a house (2012) New York Premiere

The Friends of MATA
Gleb Kanasevich, clarinet
Tristan Kasten-Krause, bass
Matt Evans, Amy Garapic, Caitlin Cawley, percussion

with
Conrad Tao, piano
Paul Pinto, voice

IRL

Friday, April 12th, 2019

On Friday, April 12, the Friends of MATA, and their conductor, Carl Bettendorf, are joined by guest vocalists Lucy Fitz Gibbon and Charlotte Mundy for irl, an eclectic program that examines the complexity of communication in today’s world.  Composers, filmmakers and performers from Iceland to Turkey to Brazil come together explore the ways in which intent can be misunderstood, systems can fail, and how human communication can seem impossible.  With performances by composer-performers Ali Can Puskulcu and Daniel Corral (Timur and the Dime Museum), and the American premiere of Maja Hannisdal and Tone Kittelsen’s short film The Nordic Escape with music by Kristín þóra Haraldsdóttir, irl takes the challenges of communication head-on to understand how we may truly connect in the social media age.

Friday, April 12

8PM at the The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
$25

Tickets available at The Kitchen

Anna-Louise Walton (USA) Small Songs (2018) New York Premiere
Ali Can Puskulcu (Turkey/USA) Gibberish Shreds Vol. 1 (2018) New York Premiere
Daniel Corral (USA) Comma (2016) New York Premiere
Aurelio Edler-Copes (Brazil/France) Hörspiel 1 (2017) US Premiere
Kristín þóra Haraldsdóttir (Iceland), Tone Kittelsen (Norway), and Maja Hannisdal (Norway) The Nordic Escape (2016/17) US Premiere

 

The Friends of MATA
Carl Christian Bettendorf, conductor

Emi Ferguson, flute
Nadav Lev, guitar
Caitlin Cawley, percussion

with

Lucy Fitz Gibbon, Charlotte Mundy, vocalists
Ali Can Puskulcu, violin
Daniel Corral, electronics

Past Perfect

Thursday, April 11th, 2019

On Thursday, April 11, the 21st annual MATA Festival opens with Past Perfect, a triptych of intimate works that use dis- and re-embodied voices to reflect how our choices define us.  Cellist John Popham joins the Bennardo-Larson Duo to animate haunting works by Julie Herndon (You Can Only) and Matt Evans (Still Life 1a+1b) framing Dutch composer Thomas Bensdorp’s revealing personal drama Family Plot for video and automated music boxes. This cathartic evening demonstrates that even in the face of absence, individual voices maintain their power.

 

Thursday, April 11

8PM at the The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, NYC
$25

Tickets available at The Kitchen

Matt Evans (USA) Still Life (No. 1a + No. 1b) (2014)
Julie Herndon (USA) You Can Only (2017) New York Premiere
Thomas Bensdorp (Netherlands) Family Plot (2013) US Premiere

Bennardo-Larson Duo
Maya Bennardo, violin
Karl Larson, piano

with
John Popham, cello

Storefront Sound Installation

Saturday, April 18th, 2015

DoronSadja-installation-03

Tuesday, April 14 – Saturday, April 18, 11am to 7pm each day

Chashama 266W 37th St

“Closer Before We Touch” is an animatronic sound sculpture exploring the interplay between physical and simulated spatialization. Consisting of a motor driven set of speakers thrusting in and out towards the storefront gallery window, the work alternates between waves of noise and difference tones: beating, panning, and clustering around each other. The continuous movement of sound – at once both dizzying and mesmerizing – creates a disorienting space where sonic materiality flows in and out of ambiguity and the perception of depth exists in an intangible position between the real and the simulated.